anyhowonly

.anything two-wheels, travel, food, beauty, fashion and my personal musings.

With this ring…

I have been seeing a growing number of couples going for non-diamond engagement rings and thought it would be helpful if I shared my experience of going with a non-diamond engagement ring.

My husband proposed to me some years ago but he didn’t really ‘put a ring on it’ possibly because I think he knew that I wasn’t quite the I-want-a-diamond-solitaire type of gal, and I am fussy about certain things. I mean, I knew he was going to pop the question sooner or later because we had been talking about marriage for the longest time and every time I so much as walked near a jewellery shop, he seemed enthusiastic to have me point out something.

Almost every jewellery shop we went past or ventured into sold diamond rings and it was hard to come across a non-diamond ring that spoke to me. After shopping around for close to two years, it finally happened one day. We were walking around aimlessly in a mall and I wandered into a jewellery shop. I browsed their selection and saw a pink-coloured stone that piqued my interest. I had never seen another stone quite like it and I liked it immediately. I later learnt the name of this stone – Morganite.

A morganite is a rare, light pink-colored stone that was reportedly discovered on off the coast of Madagascar in 1910 and Tiffany’s celebrated gemologist Dr. George Kunz named this pink stone morganite in honour of Tiffany patron, financier J.P. Morgan.

While diamonds are traditionally used in engagement rings, today, there is a growing number of couples who are choosing gemstones and other coloured semi-precious stones. I know I am not alone in saying this but in all honesty, diamond engagement rings are pretty but clichéd and definitely not for me. I knew I didn’t want a diamond ring from the get-go especially after seeing so many girl friends sporting solitaires and diamond variations, diamond rings just didn’t speak to me.

Naturally, I didn’t walk out of the store with the ring that day but I went home to research the stone and was convinced when I read somewhere that said the morganite strengthens the bonds of love.

tiffany pink morganite bracelet vogue last look april 2006

Here are some photos of morganite engagement rings.

Morganite engagement ring | Photo courtersy: www.samnsue.com

Morganite engagement ring | Photo courtersy: http://www.samnsue.com

Morganite engagement ring | Photo courtersy: www.samnsue.com

Morganite engagement ring | Photo courtersy: http://www.samnsue.com

Morganite engagement ring | Photo courtersy: www.samnsue.com

Morganite engagement ring | Photo courtersy: http://www.samnsue.com

For those who might be interested, here’s little more information about morganite (information taken from MineralMiners.com)

Name Origin and Meaning – In 1911 at the suggestion of gemologist George F. Kunz, namesake of kunzite, the former “pink beryl” was renamed after J. Pierpont Morgan, an American banker and collector, in honour of his gemological and mineral contributions to the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Morgan was an avid collector and a customer of Tiffany’s, where much of the country’s morganite was sold at that time.

Phenomenon – In rare cases, morganite can display chatoyancy (the cat’s-eye effect) or asterism (a star) if cut to display such effects.

Discovery and History – Discovered in the early 1900s and known for a while as simply “pink beryl,” morganite was renamed as a separate gem in 1911. It has a relatively brief history, but with modern society’s fondness for pink, morganite is gaining popularity in modern jewelry and is certain to become as well-known to the public as it is loved by collectors.

Hardness – Morganite is sturdy and wears well because its hardness level is a 7.5 to 8 on the Mohs scale. Developed by German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs in 1812, the Mohs scale measures the hardness of a mineral on a level from one to 10, with one being the softest and 10 being the hardest. The hardest mineral on the scale is the diamond. The hardness of morganite is comparable to that of quartz or topaz.

It’s been close to three years and my morganite has held up well. Here’s a look at my ring. I’m really hoping that more couples take the less-than-ordinary route of choosing a non-diamond engagement ring. Don’t flame me for saying this but as I have said, there’s nothing wrong with diamond rings – just maybe it would be nice to have a wider variety of colours and stones to look at at engagement parties and on my girl friends’ fingers.

photo2photo1 (2)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on March 14, 2014 by in Shopping and tagged , , , .
%d bloggers like this: